Comment on Begin Again: Eminent Intro Post 2017 by lucas

Wow – you’re back!
Oh man, you’ve definitely just opened up a can of worms for me. I absolutely agree with you – Shostakovich was not necessarily a “classical” composer at all in the Beethovenien (did you know the first song ever sung in space was by him??). I guess it reflects that Russians had much better music tastes when we do now? I’m only a little joking. But to share a bit of wisdom from a friend I’ve been recently chatting with about Shosti, he said something along the lines that the importance could be attributed to how art was perhaps the only expression that offered a little freedom back then. Music, after all (especially classical music), is so abstract that you can really take anything you want from it.

Lucas

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Comment on Begin Again: Eminent Intro Post 2017 by lucas

Thanks for the comment! Although the intrigue of this character is the main reason I selected him as my Eminent Person, I do also enjoy his music very much. I’m currently listening to his 15 symphonies, which have been called “a message to mankind”. He had a very eclectic and modern compositional style, which I am not used to hearing at all. I do believe that his story will help possibly provide me with some insight as to what it’s like to be a professional musician. Also, as mentioned in the post, my study is nearly turning into a historical study, and I hope to learn tips from interviewees and experts from the field on how to make interpretive decisions based on the information I have.

Lucas

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Comment on Loving Vincent: An Introduction by lucas

Hey Deon! This is a really well written post. It is completely able to convey your passion for Mr. van Gogh, and I’m super excited to see what’s going to come out of your project (I think my dad is too :P).
A few questions:
1. van Gogh does not seem like the most positive of characters. What, if any, were parts of his life that he cherished?
2. What was his view on painting, i.e. what release did it give him from his actual life, and how important did he think it was?

Lucas

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Comment on Science 9 Final: Steinway, Spruce and Soundboards by lucas

Thanks so much, Yuwen! I’m happy you learned something new, as I definitely did for sure! I made sure to fully understand the information I was ready before I started writing it, so that’s good that you could understand everything.
It’s absolutely true as to how, over a long period of time, the continuous clear-cutting of these old-growth forests will lead to significant damage to the environment.
Interesting question – although this has never happened (the Boganyi piano is relatively new and I don’t believe there are models of it that are for sale), a very similar and interesting study occurred with violins. The renowned Stradivarius violins, built more than 200 years ago, are supposedly better in sound and tone, according to nearly all violinists (one sold in 2007 for more than 3 million dollars!). However, a blind test showed that just 3 out of 17 professional violinists could tell the difference between a Stradivarius and a new violin. This shows that, just like the Boganyi piano, most of the reasons why newer designs haven’t become popular is because of the psychological and historical attachment that musicians have to older instruments with more organic material.
Although I would definitely agree that comparison concerts are an interesting idea, I’m not sure it would do anything at this point to change the opinion of larger piano manufacturers. As I said in my reply to Melissa’s comment, these companies are incredibly confident of their opinion that using wood is objectively better.
Thanks for the comment!
Lucas
P.S. Here’s the link to the Stradivarius study: https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2017/05/stradivarius-violins-lose-against-new-instruments-for-the-third-time/525798/

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