Comment on Objection! by lucas

My dearest, dearest Bennett,

I must admit that even I could not suppress a chuckle at this little trifle of an editorial (which, if you need assistance as to how to actually write something coherent, you know where to find it – I’m quite sure I could send over a few copies of The Globe sooner or later on the intercolonial railway :). This cute thing seems to exhibit the exact innocence and naivety that overcomes all Maritimers – a healthy belief that you people are special, that Her Majesty seems to adore you, and that your (sinking) toy ship industry will somehow sustain your excuse-for-an-economy.

Why do you think that your resources are so special – were they not discovered by the same sort of people that found the rest of British North America? And those people, the English and Her Majesty, would not spare even a single tear if our colonies suddenly dismembered ourselves from her. Confederation will bring growth to the Maritimes through an intercolonial railway, and although I confess to be a critic of most of Mr. Macdonald’s workings, economic growth and profits to purchase Rupert’s Land must appeal to any sane man.

Finally, I am to share a passage from a journalist, one of your own Maritimers:
“Ask a true man, who loves his country for itself why he is in favor of Union, and he will tell you: I am in favor of Union, because I wish to remain a loyal subject of Queen Victoria; because it will cement more closely these Colonies and the Mother Country; because England desired it in order to consolidate our strength; because it will ensure us against aggression.”

Guess you can’t bribe everyone to pretend that the Maritimes are anti-Confederation, eh?
Sincerely,
George Brown

P.S. I must also laugh at your apparently foretelling mind – I have scoured all records of some kind of “Anti-Confederation Song”, and cannot seem to find any record of it. http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/quotthe-anti-confederation-songquot-emc/

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Comment on Socials DOL #2- Independent Inquiry by lucas

Thanks for the post, Lauryn! I enjoyed reading it a lot, not only because it taught me new facts I had never learned about the involvement of Chinese Canadians in the building of the CPR (such as the bond formed between Indigenous and Chinese workers). I also felt that you connected your event very well to the issues still surrounding minorities and immigrants today. I especially found it interesting when you theorized how people today would respond if the treatment of Chinese workers happened right now.

A connection to my own post that I wrote about John A Macdonald is about his deliberately racist treatment of Chinese Canadians. He successfully debated for the ban of any Chinese Canadians voting, and also helped institute the head tax. I agree with you – it seemed as if he was fully aware of the dangerous and awful working conditions he was placing the workers in, but prioritized the completion of the railroad and his own ego over the lives of human beings.

Lucas

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Comment on Independent Investigation: The Chinese Immigration Act by lucas

I really enjoyed reading your post, Aislyn! First of all, you covered all the events that occurred in a very clear and logical sequence. I could completely understand why the tax was implemented, the immediate repercussions of the head tax, and the current impacts that the head tax still has on some Chinese-Canadians. Also, your last paragraph was very powerful to read, because it gave me a strong call-to-action. I completely agree with you – there is still more that can be done by every citizen of Canada to help ensure equality is seen for all minority groups.

A connection I drew between my own investigation and yours was about the implementation of the tax. John A Macdonald, who I investigated, heavily supported the tax, and also wanted to ban Chinese-Canadians from voting (he succeeded). However, it is important to note that a very notable Liberal Prime Minister after him, Wilfrid Laurier, raised the tax to $500.

Lucas

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Comment on Canadian Independant Investigation by lucas

What a great post, Connor! I really enjoyed reading it, particularly:
1. The detail in which you explained the Seven Years War and the Battle on the Plains of Abraham. After reading your post, I understand the events of battle much more clearly than the CBC documentary. It felt like I was reading a detailed battle guide!
2. how well you covered every side that was involved in the conflict very well. I understood why Britain and France wanted to fight each other in the Seven Years’ War, and what the two commanders’ rationales were for choosing the battle strategy they did. I also like how you connected to our studies of Hamilton last year!

One connection I made to my own independent investigation about John A. Macdonald was during your section about the various factions that lived in Quebec as a result of the battle. Both the French and the British felt somewhat that they were treated unfairly in the terms of surrender documents and the Quebec Act, and John A. Macdonald made sure during his mandate that there were several groups of people that were marginalized and assimilated in Canada.

Lucas

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