Comment on Independant Inquiry by deon

Very nice Document of Learning Megan!
You demonstrate great critical-thinking abilities in this DOL, making your analysis of the French’s defeat easy to follow. Your points are very clear to the reader, and your logic is laid out in a succinct manner!
I also greatly admire your understanding of the speculations that exist in history, and how we may never know what could’ve happened if Montcalm had a different decision. I appreciate your ability to infer circumstances using evidence and logic.
Since we share the similar topic of the Battles of Plains of Abraham, my post had a lot of connection to yours! One interesting that I would like to point was the fact that Wolfe was likely the reason why Montcalm’s army consisted of untrained men. Wolfe treated French villagers quite terribly during the period and drove a lot of untrained civilians to join Montcalm’s militia out of spite for the British. Combining both your research and my inquiry, I daresay that Wolfe was indirectly responsible for the poor military tactics on the French side.
Keep up the great work Megan!
-Deon :3

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Comment on DOL #2: CPR by deon

Great Document of Learning Tony!
I found your inquiry to be very extensive, covering not only short-term benefits of the CPR, but also the long-lasting scars the construction created. I especially enjoyed the many connections/ speculations you made about trends observed in today’s world and how that could’ve been a consequence of the Canadian Pacific Railway.
I also think you had a very nice balance of the two opposing perspectives of the CPR in your post. This Document of Learning included wide perspectives from both sides. I am impressed by your ability to avoid judgement or narrow-thinking in this problem, forming a truly well-developed inquiry that recognizes both pros and cons.
A connection to my post about the personality of James Wolfe is the narrowness in which we have been retelling history. James Wolfe, a man who was martyred after his death at the Battles of Plains of Abraham, held a rather poor reputation amongst his officers that is unknown to many today. Similarly, your post addresses the flat and one-sided stories told about the CPR and its benefits, and the importance of acknowledging the “three-dimensional” complexity to historical problems.
Thank you for sharing this insightful post with us!
-Deon :3

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Comment on Socials Document of Learning #2 by deon

Fantastic Document of Learning Liam!
First of all, your clear and concise writing style shines through very brightly in this DOL. Not only did you integrate well-researched evidence very smoothly into your own writing, your straightforward yet informative style made the text very easy to comprehend. I had no difficulties following your logic even though it is on one of my weakest subjects, economics and trades (don’t tell anyone that).
I also particularly enjoyed your in-depth comparison in the Continuity and Change section. I found the contrast between the modern definition of entrepreneurship and Radisson and Des Groseilliers especially interesting to read. Your abilities to draw comparisons between different concepts in different periods is very strong.
Although our Documents of Learning are about two completely different topics in two completely different periods, I think both James Wolfe and Radisson & Des Groseilliers contributed to the strong distinctions Francophone Canadians felt to Anglophone Canadians. While your DOL features a more economic factor, I believe mine is more social or political. Due to the merciless tactics Wolfe used on French civilians, the French detested the British even stronger than before. Similarly, the conquer of Rupert’s land by the British likely also caused the French to dislike the English because of their economic competition.
Overall, a very well-done Document of Learning and thank you for teaching me something about the HBC!

-Deon :3

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Comment on Loving Vincent: An Introduction by deon

Hi Lucas!
Thank you very much for your comment! I’m really glad that you (and your dad) show interest in my eminent person!
To answer your question:
1) Vincent van Gogh’s life was not completely filled with sadness and agony. Although there were times of despair, he also enjoyed certain eras in his life. The happiest times of his life were likely when he worked as an art dealer for his uncle, as well as when he first moved to the Arles to start a studio for artists. Both of these periods, however, ended in a tragedy as van Gogh was removed from his position a year after; and cut off his own ear in distraught after a heated fight with Paul Gauguin. During his last year, he created many paintings of his childhood memories of Brabant while he was admitted in the asylum. This could also possibly indicate that he longed to go back to his childhood, despite his cold description of his youth.
2) Painting had always been a big respite for Vincent, especially during his years at the asylum. He took refuge in drawing and painting the world around him, as the act of doing so relieved his psychotic attacks. Unfortunately, on some days his episodes became so severe that he would not be able to paint. His major view on painting was centred around nature and reality, presumably influenced by his countryside childhood in Brabant. Paul Gauguin, on the other hand, preferred more imaginative approaches to art. This creative differentiation created huge disputes between the two artists, eventually causing Vincent to cut off his own ears. Van Gogh believed that art was a crucial part of his life, as stated in his quote ” I risk my life for my own work and my reason half foundered in it”.
Again, thank you for your questions! I look forward to your project too!
Deon

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Comment on Talons English 10: View and Respond #1 by deon

In her amazing TED Talk, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie presents that single sides of stories often create incomplete stereotypes that rob the subject of dignity. A historic example would be the legend of Alexander Hamilton, retold through the award-winning Broadway musical “Hamilton” by Lin- Manuel Miranda. One of the biggest themes of the musical, best expressed in its own words: “You have no control who lives, who dies, who tells your story” (Lin- Manuel Miranda), highlights the feeble power we possess upon other’s narrative of us. After his unfortunate death duel with Aaron Burr, Alexander Hamilton’s remarkable legend gets covered surreptitiously by Aaron Burr’s “single story” of his scandal. It is not in denial that he enacted adultery, but it’s simply ignorant to assume that’s all there is to the story, and negligibly dismiss any accounts of his positive contributions. This is most likely why Hamilton is one of the least popular founding fathers and was even threatened to be taken off the ten dollar bill, until Lin- Manuel Miranda relived his tale through the hip-hop musical “Hamilton”. One of the many significances of Lin’s ingenious work is that he sheds light to an untold perspective. We can follow this model by paying deserved homage to unnoticed yet eminent people. That being said, the TALONS Eminent Person project is an excellent beginning to reject the “single stories” by bringing attention to hidden geniuses of this world.

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Comment on TED- Ed: The Genetics of Depression- Deon by deon

Hello Sam,
Thank you for your thoughtful feedback!
Aside from genetic and psychological factors, major life events or experiences may also affect depression. However, by major life events it also includes that of positive ones. Such as moving into college, getting married, childbirth etc. Although such events seem to have a positive impact on the person, big changes like these can lead to depression due to the unfamiliarity of these events. Depression can also be influenced by how you were raised as a child. So if you grew up with close relatives suffering from depression, as a child you may view these symptoms as normal and eventually start behaving so.
That’s the best answer I can give, hopefully your question is answered!
Again, thank you for your comment!

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Comment on TED- Ed: The Genetics of Depression- Deon by deon

Thank you very much for your comment.
That is a great question Jason. Although study shows that rats (a social animal) with damaged hippocampi withdrew from social interactions, this does not directly connect to depression. It is a peculiar result seeing that rats usually interact with other rats. However, it’s more likely to say that this information suggests a relationship between hippocampus volume and social interaction, rather than social interaction and depression. In other words, just because an organism has a lack of social interaction does not mean that they have depression. Simply because this species might not be social at all. All of the animal- related depression studies still does not have a solid conclusion that animals even have depression at all.
I hope this answers your question, thank you for your feedback Jason!

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