Comment on Talons English 10: View and Respond #1 by Charlotte

Growing up in a world of news stories and political conflict, we’re fed single stories for most of our lives. Contradicting radical opinions shape our views and form the people we become. We may not even be aware of our obvious bias, as it’s so deeply instilled into our society that we become dull to the blare of truth. As people, we must learn to cancel out the noise and pay attention to the world around us as those have done in the past. Today, humanity is learning to see past gender barriers we didn’t even know were there until recently. The idea that there were only two genders was a single story until activists and forward-thinkers said their piece. To reject single stories we must allow platforms for those with unpopular opinions, no matter how much we disagree with what they have to say. Listening and being critical of thoughts that aren’t our own is the only way to see the full picture.

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Comment on The Science of Heartbreak by charlotte

How long heartbreak lasts depends entirely on the person. Coping mechanisms and level of attachment differ from person-to-person and it would be hard to give a definite answer to that question.

However, according to a study done by <em>Journal of Positive Psychology</em> 71% of the 155 young adults surveyed said that it took them about 3 months, or 11 weeks, to fully see the positive aspects of their breakup and grow as a person.

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Comment on The Science of Heartbreak by charlotte

While I talked mostly about the science in my talk, heartbreak is very much an emotional process, and not just the release of neurochemicals. The kind of heartbreak/pain you experience depends completely on your connection and attachment to that person, your own individual coping mechanisms, and past experiences.

It could be argued that the events leading up to a breakup change how the heartbreak feels. For example, if you were the one initiating the breakup, you wouldn’t be caught off guard and therefore wouldn’t experience the same amount of shock and immediate rush of cortisol as the other person.

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Comment on The Science of Heartbreak by charlotte

Cortisol levels can be managed by drinking water (dehydration causes the body to go into stress and release excess cortisol) Exercising (to increase dopamine), and deep breathing exercises will turn on the body’s natural relaxation system, called the parasympathetic nervous system.

On a less scientific note, spending time with other people you love and talking out what you’re feeling and getting closure are effective ways to deal with heartbreak as well.

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Comment on TalonTED Talk – Ideologies that should be shared by charlotte

I really enjoyed your ted talk Sid! Allergies are a fascinating subject, and one I don’t have a lot of knowledge on. It was interesting to hear about allergy prevention, as it’s not something that I even know was possible before your talk. The editing of your video was very clean and the flow of your content was clear and concise. As a child of an immigrant, I have heard that immigration may cause skin rashes etc. from the reaction between the skin and the air. Do you think this is backed by science?

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